Chicken Pox

Chickenpox (known medically as varicella) is a highly contagious disease caused by a virus called the varicella-zoster virus. It’s spread quickly and easily from someone who is infected. Chickenpox is an airborne disease which spreads easily through the coughs and sneezes of an infected person.

Complications may occasionally include pneumonia, inflammation of the brain, and bacterial skin infections. The disease is often more severe in adults than in children particularly pregnant women & those who smoke. Symptoms begin 10 to 21 days after exposure to the virus.

The chicken pox virus is also linked to Shingles where the elderly are more at risk. For babies and those that immunosuppressed bleeding complications are greatly increased.

Travel Vaccinations
Per Dose
Course
Chickenpox/Varicella (call to reserve)
£80 per dose
2 Doses

Prevention

Most adults are immune to chickenpox– having had it in childhood– as it is very unlikely you will become infected with the disease more than once. It can be vaccinated against, requiring 2 doses to be taken 6 weeks apart, which will come into effect approximately 4-8 weeks after the 2nd dose has been administered. In the UK the vaccine is predominantly recommended to certain healthcare workers and anyone who regularly comes into contact with immune-compromised patients[1].

The 2nd dose vaccine is highly effective in children and can be given from 1 year of age. Vaccination or previous chicken pox illness stops the need for an immunoglobulin in high risk groups if exposed.

[1] Vaccination UK https://travelvaccination.co.uk/vaccination/varilix-chicken-pox/

Countries at risk

Chickenpox is prevalent all over the world, and the fact that it is highly contagious means that anyone who is unvaccinated and exposed to the disease is almost certain to become infected[1].

[1] NCBI https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279622/

Travel Precautions

Most airlines will not allow a passenger with chickenpox to fly, so you should contact your airline in advance if you are intending to travel with the illness[1].

[1] NHS https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chickenpox/

Signs and Symptoms

1 to 3 weeks after exposure to the chickenpox virus red spots begin to appear on the body. These will start to blister as they fill with fluid, sometimes bursting or spreading to other areas. Eventually they will crust over and turn to scabs, clearing up after around 5 days. However, the symptoms are not limited to the chickenpox rash, as sufferers may also experience sickness, aches and pains throughout the body, headaches, body temperatures exceeding 38°C and a lack of appetite[1].

[1] NHS site

FAQ's

Diphtheria, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Rabies, Cholera, Japanese Encephalitis, Tick-borne Encephalitis, Tetanus, Polio, Typhoid, Yellow Fever, Malaria, Meningococcal Meningitis, Chicken Pox, Meningitis B, HPV & Flu*   *Flu vaccines are seasonal

This varies from country to country and depends on your previous history and itinerary. Our specialist travel nurse will provide you with the most up to date information on travel health, specific to the planned destination. You can look to see our general guideline for recommended vaccines for each country in our Vaccination guideline. For general vaccinations such as chickenpox or flu, our consultation process will also advise you according to your individual health requirements.

We can only see the vaccines that you have received in our clinics.

The necessity of certain vaccinations is dependent on a number of key risk factors, including destination of travel, duration and season of travel, standards of accommodation, food hygiene and sanitation, and traveller behaviour. To identify what level of risk you are likely to face, it can be prudent to book an appointment with a travel nurse who can help advise on the most critical vaccinations to choose.

London Travel Clinic offers same day, evening, and weekend appointments in over twenty strategically placed locations throughout the Greater London area. No matter your location, you are never too far from London’s travel health experts. You can book vaccines online here, or, for more information, contact 020 34321 381.

In most cases, it is not too late to be vaccinated again. The main rule is that you must continue the vaccination program you have started. If you are in doubt, send us an email at enquiries@londontravelclinic.co.uk where we will be able to help you with your question and be able to book a time for the next vaccination.

London Travel Clinics are a private vaccination service. This means that all of our vaccinations, antimalarials and travel related retail products incur a fee. The only exception would be where our clinic is supporting a federated GP model, where a partnership exists, and we provide the travel health service on behalf of a participating GP surgery, such as in Wandsworth. In that particular scenario, where vaccines are available on the NHS, they continue to be made available on the NHS, where booked at least a minimum of 6-8 weeks in advance of the travel date. All other on NHS travel health vaccines, antimalarials or retail products will continue to be charged privately.

Yes we do. In addition to our travel service, we offer private general health vaccinations such as Chicken Pox, Flu, HPV, Meningitis ACWY, Meningitis B, MMR, Pneumonia and Shingles. We can also offer blood tests for those who need proof of immunity.

Yes we do. In addition to our travel service, we offer private occupational health vaccinations such as Hepatitis A and B, Rabies and Diphtheria, Polio and Tetanus. We can also offer blood tests for those who need proof of immunity.