Boat on the shore of a river in Guyana Upper part of Kaieteur Falls in Guyana

Travel Vaccinations for Guyana

Vaccines To Consider When Visiting Guyana

A consultation will be completed with one of our specialist travel health nurses to assess your individual travel plans and health background before making recommendations, which can then be administered during the same appointment.

Yellow Fever + Certificate
From £83
Hepatitis B (call to reserve)
From £57
Hepatitis A - Adult
From £93
Rabies
From £75
Typhoid
From £60
Tetanus, Diphtheria & Polio
From £50
There is a risk of Malaria in Guyana. London Travel Clinic offers a range of antimalarials to keep you protected

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Foot of Kaieteur Falls in Guyana

Destination Information for Guyana

The small country of Guyana, on the North Atlantic coast of South America, is an English-speaking former British colony. It was originally settled by the Dutch, but came into British possession by 1815, achieving its independence from the UK in 1966. This tropical country is mainly comprised of rainforest, with a mountainous area on the Northeast, around Kamarang.

The capital is Georgetown, on the Guyanese Coastal Plain, with its British colonial architecture and timber-built Anglican Cathedral. Here you can visit the National Museum and purchase locally-made crafts and souvenirs at the market.

Eco-tourism is emerging as a popular industry in Guyana, with visitors heading to the country to climb the mountains, spend time on the beaches and see the spectacular scenery and wildlife of this beautiful country. The Kaieteur Falls is a breathtaking waterfall five times the height of Niagara, which can be visited as a daytrip from Georgetown. Shell Beach, on the Northwest, is a fabulous place to go to see turtles laying in a protected conservation area.

Guyana is a great choice for travellers who want to avoid typical tourist hotspots and to explore a stunning South American country with a rich variety of attractions. From golden beaches and lush rainforests to wild waterfalls and rare mammal species, this is a natural wonderland that is well worth the effort to visit.

Infections and Outbreaks frequently change from country to country and by attending our clinics you will be given the most up to date clinical and safety advice from our team of specialists. Our advice to you often includes aspects such as:

Chikungunya in the Carribean/Americas

The outbreak of chikungunya virus infection in various Caribbean islands and the Americas is ongoing; WHO/PAHO has published further epidemiological data on countries reporting autochthonous transmission.

Non-Latin Caribbean:

  • Anguilla, 71 suspected cases, 55 confirmed.
  • Antigua and Barbuda, 1,442 suspected cases, 18 confirmed.
  • Aruba, 474 suspected cases, 743 confirmed.
  • Bahamas, 99 confirmed cases.
  • Barbados, 1,897 suspected cases, 122 confirmed.
  • Cayman Islands, 229 suspected cases, 44 confirmed.
  • Curacao, 1,838 suspected cases, 835 confirmed. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • Dominica, 3,598 suspected cases, 173 confirmed.
  • Grenada, 3,070 suspected cases, 26 confirmed. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • Guyana, 5,310 suspected cases, 105 confirmed.
  • Jamaica, 1,669 suspected cases, 87 confirmed.
  • Montserrat, 118 suspected cases, 14 confirmed.
  • St Kitts and Nevis, 627 suspected cases, 28 confirmed.
  • St Lucia, 645 suspected cases, 238 confirmed.
  • Sint Maarten, 470 confirmed cases. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines, 1,223 suspected cases, 175 confirmed.
  • Suriname, 1,210 confirmed cases. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • Trinidad and Tobago, 313 confirmed cases.
  • Turks and Caicos, 19 confirmed cases. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • UK Virgin Islands, 347 suspected cases, 47 confirmed cases. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • US Virgin Islands, 1,541 suspected cases, 376 confirmed.

Malaria and regions within country:

There is a high risk of P.Falciparum and P.Vivax malaria throughout the country. Coastal areas are the exception. These areas, including the city of Georgetown, have a low to no risk of malaria.

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Non Vaccinated Diseases

West Nile virus

West Nile virus (WNV) is spread by mosquitoes in many countries. There are usually no symptoms, although some people develop mild flu-like symptoms, nausea and skin rash. The virus is not contagious and should get better without any treatment.

Travel Kits and Accessories
Price
Deet 50% - 100ml
£8
Deet 50% - 50ml
£6
Lifesystems EX4 Anti-Mozzie Fabric Spray - 350ml
£8.50
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Single
£20
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Double
£25
Natural Mosquito Repellent - 100ml
£7.75

Zika virus

Zika virus is usually transmitted by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. These mosquitoes are most active during the day, especially during mid-morning, then late afternoon and dusk through to evening. For most people it's a very mild infection with minor or no symptoms, but is more of a risk to pregnant woman as it could result in certain birth defects.

Travel Kits and Accessories
Price
Deet 50% - 100ml
£8
Deet 50% - 50ml
£6
Lifesystems EX4 Anti-Mozzie Fabric Spray - 350ml
£8.50
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Single
£20
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Double
£25
Natural Mosquito Repellent - 100ml
£7.75

Chikungunya

Chikungunya is a viral disease transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes and it causes fever and severe joint pain. Other symptoms include muscle pain, headache, nausea, fatigue and rash. Joint pain is often debilitating and can vary in duration. The disease shares some clinical signs with Dengue, and can be misdiagnosed in areas where Dengue is common. There is no cure for the disease. Treatment is focused on relieving the symptoms.

Travel Kits and Accessories
Price
Deet 50% - 100ml
£8
Deet 50% - 50ml
£6
Lifesystems Bed Bug Barrier Bedsheet
£12.99
Lifesystems EX4 Anti-Mozzie Fabric Spray - 350ml
£8.50
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Single
£20
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Double
£25

Dengue Fever

Dengue Fever is a viral disease which develops from mosquito bites during the day time. There is no treatment, only symptomatic relief. Symptoms include: High fever (40°C), severe headache, pain behind the eyes, muscle and joint pains, nausea, vomiting, swollen glands and a rash usually lasting for 2-7 days. WHO estimates 390 million cases of Dengue infections per year.

Travel Kits and Accessories
Price
Deet 50% - 100ml
£8
Deet 50% - 50ml
£6
Lifesystems EX4 Anti-Mozzie Fabric Spray - 350ml
£8.50
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Single
£20
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Double
£25

Leishmaniasis

A parasitic disease transmitted by the bite of an infected sandfly. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (the most common): Causes skin lesions, mainly ulcers on exposed parts of the body, causing scars and serious disability. 90% of cases are in the Americas, the Mediterranean basin, the Middle East and Asia. Visceral Leishmaniasis (the most dangerous): Causes enlarged spleen and liver, anaemia, weight loss and irregular bouts of fever. Highly endemic in the Indian Subcontinent and East Africa. Mucotaneous (the least common): Causes partial or total destruction of the mucous membranes in the nose, mouth and throat. Most cases are found in Peru, Bolivia and Brazil.

Travel Kits and Accessories
Price
Deet 50% - 100ml
£8
Deet 50% - 50ml
£6
Lifesystems EX4 Anti-Mozzie Fabric Spray - 350ml
£8.50
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Single
£20
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Double
£25

Trypanosomiasis

Human African trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness, is a parasitic disease transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected tsetse fly, which is only found in rural Africa. Initial symptoms include severe headache, insomnia, enlarged lymph nodes, anaemia and rash.

Travel Kits and Accessories
Price
Deet 50% - 100ml
£8
Deet 50% - 50ml
£6
Lifesystems EX4 Anti-Mozzie Fabric Spray - 350ml
£8.50
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Single
£20
Lifesystems Micro Mosquito Net - Double
£25
Natural Mosquito Repellent - 100ml
£7.75

Additional Health Risks Information for Guyana

Guyana is a beautiful country, but travelling here also has its risks. Serious crime is known to be an issue, particularly in the capital, Georgetown, and it is not safe to travel after dark. Avoid travelling alone if you can, and keep money, valuables and your passport out of sight. The road conditions are difficult in places, with the surfaces being poorly maintained, damaged due to heavy rainfall and the standard of vehicles and driving generally low. Use a reputable taxi firm if you are travelling by road. The rainy season in Guyana is from May to August and from November to January. Flooding may occur during these times.

Medical facilities in Guyana are limited, with a lack of facilities and trained medical staff. In an emergency you may be required to be evacuated. Ensure you have adequate travel insurance in place that provides for this possibility. Guyana is affected by the Zika virus. Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant should not visit the country. All other visitors should take steps to avoid being bitten by mosquitos. As with travel to all countries, you should be aware of your personal and food hygiene, taking care that everything you eat has been prepared properly in order to avoid food poisoning. The tap water in Guyana is not safe to drink.

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