Vaccines advised to ALL Guyana visitors

Vaccines advised to SOME Guyana visitors i The vaccines you need will depend on where in the country you are visiting, how long you will stay and what activities you will undertake during your trip. During your consultation our nurse will advise if you should consider any of the following vaccinations.

There is a risk of Malaria in Guyana. London Travel Clinic offers a range of antimalarials to keep you protected

NOTE: British travellers should also ensure they have adequate protection from MEASLES, MUMPS and RUBELLA and TUBERCULOSIS, which are normally given as part of the childhood vaccination schedule.

Destination Information for Guyana

The small country of Guyana, on the North Atlantic coast of South America, is an English-speaking former British colony. It was originally settled by the Dutch, but came into British possession by 1815, achieving its independence from the UK in 1966. This tropical country is mainly comprised of rainforest, with a mountainous area on the Northeast, around Kamarang.

The capital is Georgetown, on the Guyanese Coastal Plain, with its British colonial architecture and timber-built Anglican Cathedral. Here you can visit the National Museum and purchase locally-made crafts and souvenirs at the market.

Learn More

Eco-tourism is emerging as a popular industry in Guyana, with visitors heading to the country to climb the mountains, spend time on the beaches and see the spectacular scenery and wildlife of this beautiful country. The Kaieteur Falls is a breathtaking waterfall five times the height of Niagara, which can be visited as a daytrip from Georgetown. Shell Beach, on the Northwest, is a fabulous place to go to see turtles laying in a protected conservation area.

Guyana is a great choice for travellers who want to avoid typical tourist hotspots and to explore a stunning South American country with a rich variety of attractions. From golden beaches and lush rainforests to wild waterfalls and rare mammal species, this is a natural wonderland that is well worth the effort to visit.

Chikungunya in the Carribean/Americas

The outbreak of chikungunya virus infection in various Caribbean islands and the Americas is ongoing; WHO/PAHO has published further epidemiological data on countries reporting autochthonous transmission.

Non-Latin Caribbean:

  • Anguilla, 71 suspected cases, 55 confirmed.
  • Antigua and Barbuda, 1,442 suspected cases, 18 confirmed.
  • Aruba, 474 suspected cases, 743 confirmed.
  • Bahamas, 99 confirmed cases.
  • Barbados, 1,897 suspected cases, 122 confirmed.
  • Cayman Islands, 229 suspected cases, 44 confirmed.
  • Curacao, 1,838 suspected cases, 835 confirmed. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • Dominica, 3,598 suspected cases, 173 confirmed.
  • Grenada, 3,070 suspected cases, 26 confirmed. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • Guyana, 5,310 suspected cases, 105 confirmed.
  • Jamaica, 1,669 suspected cases, 87 confirmed.
  • Montserrat, 118 suspected cases, 14 confirmed.
  • St Kitts and Nevis, 627 suspected cases, 28 confirmed.
  • St Lucia, 645 suspected cases, 238 confirmed.
  • Sint Maarten, 470 confirmed cases. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines, 1,223 suspected cases, 175 confirmed.
  • Suriname, 1,210 confirmed cases. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • Trinidad and Tobago, 313 confirmed cases.
  • Turks and Caicos, 19 confirmed cases. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • UK Virgin Islands, 347 suspected cases, 47 confirmed cases. Unchanged since Jan 9 report.
  • US Virgin Islands, 1,541 suspected cases, 376 confirmed.

Malaria and regions within country:

There is a high risk of P.Falciparum and P.Vivax malaria throughout the country. Coastal areas are the exception. These areas, including the city of Georgetown, have a low to no risk of malaria. (See map above).

Malaria chemoprophylaxis for high risk zones:

Doxycycline or Atovaquone/Proguanil or Mefloquine

Chloroquine plus Proguanil should only be used if other anti-malarials cannot be tolerated as it is less effective in these regions.

Useful Links

International travel clinic locator: www.istm.org

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office: www.fco.gov.uk

British Embassy

British High Commission Georgetown
44 Main Street
Georgetown
Guyana

Email: bhcguyana@networksgy.com

Switchboard: +592 226 5881/2

Vaccine Information for Guyana

Disease & Source
Vaccination Details
Course
Price
Disease: Hepatitis A
Source: Contaminated food and water
Vaccination Details

One of the following vaccination courses may be recommended:

  • A single course injection of Havrix Monodose to cover against Hepatitis A
  • A course of three injections of Twinrix to cover against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B
  • A single dose of Hepatyrix to cover against Hepatitis A and Typhoid fever
Course
Varies
Price
Varies
Disease: Diphtheria
Source: Person to person
Vaccination Details

A single injection of Revaxis will protect against Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio. In the UK, the TDP vaccination against Diphtheria infection is part of the childhood immunisation schedule.

Course
1 dose
Price
£32.00
Disease: Tetanus
Source: Puncture wounds, burns and intravenous drug use
Vaccination Details

A single injection of Revaxis will protect against Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio. In the UK, the TDP vaccination against Diphtheria infection is part of the childhood immunisation schedule.

Course
1 dose
Price
£32.00
Disease: Polio
Source: Contaminated food and water
Vaccination Details

A single injection of Revaxis will protect against Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio. In the UK, the TDP vaccination against Diphtheria infection is part of the childhood immunisation schedule.

Course
1 dose
Price
£32.00
Disease: Yellow Fever
Source: Mosquitos
Vaccination Details

Travellers to areas at risk may require a single dose injection of Stamaril. Nearly all affected countries require proof of Yellow Fever vaccination in the form of an International Certificate of Vaccination before they allow a traveller to enter. Failure to provide a valid certificate can lead to a traveller being quarantined, immunised or denied entry.

Course
1 dose
Price
£70.00
Disease: Hepatitis B
Source: Infected blood and bodily fluids
Vaccination Details

One of the following vaccination courses may be recommended:

  • A course of three injections of Energix B to cover against Hepatitis B
  • A course of three injections of Twinrix to cover against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B
Course
Varies
Price
Varies
Disease: Rabies
Source: Animal to person
Vaccination Details

A course of three injections of the vaccine (Rabies BP or Rabipur) will cover against Rabies and is recommended. In the event of possible exposure to Rabies, urgent medical attention should be sought, even in those who have received pre-exposure vaccines.

Course
Price
Disease: Typhoid
Source: Contaminated food and water
Vaccination Details

One of the following vaccination courses may be recommended:

  • Typhim Vi, single dose injection
  • Vivotif, 3 capsules
  • Viatim, single dose injection of Hepatitis A & Typhoid combined
Course
1 dose
Price
£50.00
Disease: Malaria
Source: Mosquitos
Vaccination Details

There are a range of different anti-malarial tablets that will be prescribed to travellers based on several factors, including: destination, medical history, family history, current medications, previous problems with anti-malarial tablets, age and pregnancy.

Course
1 dose
Price
£50.00

Non-Vaccinated Diseases

Disease
Source
Our Advice
Disease: Dengue Fever
Source: Mosquitos
Our Advice: Use 50%+ Deet insect repellent
Disease: Filariasis
Source: Mosquitos
Our Advice: Use 50% Deet+ insect repellent
Disease: HIV/AIDS
Source: Bodily Fluids
Our Advice: Use a condom for sex and to never share needles or other injecting equipment (including syringes, spoons and swabs).
Disease: Leishmaniasis
Source: Sandfly
Our Advice: Use 50% Deet+ insect repellent
Disease: Leptospirosis
Source: Animals to humans
Our Advice: Avoid swallowing flood waters or water from lakes, rivers, and swamps. Avoid wading in flooded areas, especially if you have any cuts or abrasions
Disease: Schistosomiasis
Source: Parasitic Flatworms in fresh water ponds, lakes, rivers and canals
Our Advice: Avoid swimming or wading in freshwater. Drink safe water
Source: Contaminated food and water, person to person
Our Advice: Tummy kit and Tummy Kit +
Disease: Trypanosomiasis
Source: Insects
Our Advice: Use 50% Deet+ insect repellent

Additional Health Risks Information for Guyana

Guyana is a beautiful country, but travelling here also has its risks. Serious crime is known to be an issue, particularly in the capital, Georgetown, and it is not safe to travel after dark. Avoid travelling alone if you can, and keep money, valuables and your passport out of sight. The road conditions are difficult in places, with the surfaces being poorly maintained, damaged due to heavy rainfall and the standard of vehicles and driving generally low. Use a reputable taxi firm if you are travelling by road. The rainy season in Guyana is from May to August and from November to January. Flooding may occur during these times.

Medical facilities in Guyana are limited, with a lack of facilities and trained medical staff. In an emergency you may be required to be evacuated. Ensure you have adequate travel insurance in place that provides for this possibility. Guyana is affected by the Zika virus. Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant should not visit the country. All other visitors should take steps to avoid being bitten by mosquitos. As with travel to all countries, you should be aware of your personal and food hygiene, taking care that everything you eat has been prepared properly in order to avoid food poisoning. The tap water in Guyana is not safe to drink.

Book an appointment in less than a minute.
Last-minute appointments available.

Book Now