Vaccines advised to ALL Guinea visitors

Vaccines advised to SOME Guinea visitors i The vaccines you need will depend on where in the country you are visiting, how long you will stay and what activities you will undertake during your trip. During your consultation our nurse will advise if you should consider any of the following vaccinations.

NOTE: British travellers should also ensure they have adequate protection from MEASLES, MUMPS and RUBELLA and TUBERCULOSIS, which are normally given as part of the childhood vaccination schedule.

Destination Information for Guinea

The wild landscape of the former French colony of Guinea is often overlooked by travellers who are potentially put off by the instability and health risks following the recent Ebola crisis. Those who want to explore an area of Africa unspoilt by tourism, however, will find natural beauty and stunning landscapes. The capital city, Conakry, is the easiest place to get to, offering lively nightlife, markets, bars and restaurants, and from here you can take a ferry to the small archipelago of Iles de Los, with sandy beaches and a calm, relaxed feel.

There’s very little infrastructure in Guinea, which is why most travellers don’t stray far from Conakry on the Western coast of Africa. For determined explorers, you can find basic places to stay, from which to visit incredible vistas, waterfalls and cliffs, with superb hiking opportunities. The coastline tends to be the most hospitable part of the country, with beautiful beaches, and more useable roads to aid your journey. As with the people in most of West Africa, the locals are friendly and welcoming, and will often invite visitors to eat at their home.

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A total of 9 new confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) were reported during the week to 10 May 2015. Guinea reported 7 cases, Sierra Leone reported 2. As of 12 May, Sierra Leone has reported 8 consecutive days without a confirmed case.

  • Guinea - of the 7 new cases, 6 were reported from the prefecture of Forecariah, which has been the focus of transmission for several weeks. Of those 6 cases, 4 were reported from the central sub-prefecture of Moussayah, which borders the Sierra Leonean district of Kambia. Kaliah and Sikhourou, the sub-prefectures to the west and north-east of Moussayah, respectively, each reported 1 confirmed case. The remaining case in Guinea was reported from Dubreka prefecture.
  • Sierra Leone - both cases occurred in the capital, Freetown. The cases are mother and 10-year old daughter, both  are known contacts of a previous case and were under quarantine when they became symptomatic. Following treatment, the mother tested negative for EVD for a second time. The daughter remains EVD-positive and continues with treatment.

As of 13 May 2015, more than 26 724 confirmed, probable and suspected cases of EVD and more than 11 065 deaths have been reported to WHO by the Ministries of Health for Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. The distribution of the cases in West Africa is listed below, case numbers include confirmed, probable and suspected:

  • Guinea - 3597 cases and 2392 deaths, cases in last 21 days 38.
  • Sierra Leone - 12 523 cases and 3904 deaths, cases in last 21 days 22.

The risk of travellers becoming infected or developing Ebola haemorrhagic fever is extremely low, unless there has been direct contact with blood or bodily fluids of dead or living infected persons or animals. Healthcare workers are at particular risk, although practising appropriate infection control should effectively prevent transmission of disease in this setting.

Travellers returning from tropical countries should always seek rapid medical attention if they develop flu-like symptoms (such as fever, headache, diarrhoea or general malaise) within three weeks after return, and be reminded to mention to their health care provider that they have recently travelled.

Malaria and regions within country:

There is a high risk of P.Falciparum malaria throughout the entire country of Guinea and anti-malarial medication is advised.

Malaria chemoprophylaxis for high risk zones:

Doxycycline OR Atovaquone/Proguanil OR Mefloquine

If all other anti-malarials are not deemed suitable, Chloroquine plus Proguanil can be used but it is less effective.

Useful Links

International travel clinic locator: www.istm.org

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office: www.fco.gov.uk

British Embassy

British Embassy Conakry
Villa 1, Residence 2000
Corniche Sud
Conakry
Guinea

Email: britembconakry@hotmail.com
Telephone: 00 224 631 355 329

Vaccine Information for Guinea

Disease & Source
Vaccination Details
Course
Price
Disease: Hepatitis A
Source: Contaminated food and water
Vaccination Details

One of the following vaccination courses may be recommended:

  • A single course injection of Havrix Monodose to cover against Hepatitis A
  • A course of three injections of Twinrix to cover against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B
  • A single dose of Hepatyrix to cover against Hepatitis A and Typhoid fever
Course
Varies
Price
Varies
Disease: Diphtheria
Source: Person to person
Vaccination Details

A single injection of Revaxis will protect against Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio. In the UK, the TDP vaccination against Diphtheria infection is part of the childhood immunisation schedule.

Course
1 dose
Price
£50.00
Disease: Tetanus
Source: Puncture wounds, burns and intravenous drug use
Vaccination Details

A single injection of Revaxis will protect against Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio. In the UK, the TDP vaccination against Diphtheria infection is part of the childhood immunisation schedule.

Course
1 dose
Price
£50.00
Disease: Polio
Source: Contaminated food and water
Vaccination Details

A single injection of Revaxis will protect against Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio. In the UK, the TDP vaccination against Diphtheria infection is part of the childhood immunisation schedule.

Course
1 dose
Price
£50.00
Disease: Typhoid
Source: Contaminated food and water
Vaccination Details

One of the following vaccination courses may be recommended:

  • Typhim Vi, single dose injection
  • Vivotif, 3 capsules
  • Viatim, single dose injection of Hepatitis A & Typhoid combined
Course
1 dose
Price
£60.00
Disease: Yellow Fever
Source: Mosquitos
Vaccination Details

Travellers to areas at risk may require a single dose injection of Stamaril. Nearly all affected countries require proof of Yellow Fever vaccination in the form of an International Certificate of Vaccination before they allow a traveller to enter. Failure to provide a valid certificate can lead to a traveller being quarantined, immunised or denied entry.

Course
1 dose
Price
£83.00
Disease: Cholera
Source: Contaminated food and water
Vaccination Details

A course of two Dukoral tablets, which is administered orally.

Course
2 doses
Price
£40.00
Disease: Hepatitis B
Source: Infected blood and bodily fluids
Vaccination Details

One of the following vaccination courses may be recommended:

  • A course of three injections of Energix B to cover against Hepatitis B
  • A course of three injections of Twinrix to cover against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B
Course
Varies
Price
Varies
Disease: Meningococcal Meningitis
Source: Person to person
Vaccination Details

A single dose of Menveo vaccinates against Meningitis ACWY. Patients who have this vaccination will receive a certificate.

Course
1 dose
Price
Per Dose ££70.00
Disease: Rabies
Source: Animal to person
Vaccination Details

A course of three injections of the vaccine (Rabies BP or Rabipur) will cover against Rabies and is recommended. In the event of possible exposure to Rabies, urgent medical attention should be sought, even in those who have received pre-exposure vaccines.

Course
3 doses
Price
Per Dose ££75.00

Non-Vaccinated Diseases

Disease
Source
Our Advice
Source: Insects
Our Advice: Use 50%+Deet insect repellent
Disease: Chikungunya
Source: Mosquitos
Our Advice: Use 50% Deet+ insect repellent
Disease: Dengue Fever
Source: Mosquitos
Our Advice: Use 50%+ Deet insect repellent
Disease: Filariasis
Source: Mosquitos
Our Advice: Use 50% Deet+ insect repellent
Disease: Leishmaniasis
Source: Sandfly
Our Advice: Use 50% Deet+ insect repellent
Disease: HIV/AIDS
Source: Bodily Fluids
Our Advice: Use a condom for sex and to never share needles or other injecting equipment (including syringes, spoons and swabs).
Source: Contaminated food and water, person to person
Our Advice: Tummy kit and Tummy Kit +
Disease: Brucellosis
Source: Animals to humans
Our Advice: Avoid eating or drinking unpasteurized milk, cheese, or ice cream (including queso fresco)
Disease: Schistosomiasis
Source: Parasitic Flatworms in fresh water ponds, lakes, rivers and canals
Our Advice: Avoid swimming or wading in freshwater. Drink safe water
Disease: Trypanosomiasis
Source: Insects
Our Advice: Use 50% Deet+ insect repellent

Additional Health Risks Information for Guinea

If you’re planning a trip to Guinea, you should be aware that local elections are taking place during 2017, so there may be protests and demonstrations going on. These events should be peaceful, but there is always the potential for unrest and escalating violence, so stay away if possible.  There are regular reports of crime in the country, particularly targeting those travelling by road. Plan your route carefully if you’re driving, and stick to main roads avoiding rural areas when you can.

The weather conditions during the rainy season from May to October can also make travelling by road difficult, with flash flooding and landslips a possibility. Roads and cars are not well maintained, and the standard of driving is low. If you’re travelling by car, take plenty of food and fuel for your entire journey, and consider forming a convoy with other vehicles. Guinea Bissau is high risk for malaria and Yellow fever, it is advisable to visit a Travel clinic to get the necessary vaccines, medications and advice before you travel.

Healthcare in Guinea is basic. Facilities are poorly equipped and unable to deal with major illnesses. If you are seriously injured or unwell medical evacuation may be necessary, so ensure that your travel insurance will cover this if required. Take a good supply of any prescription medication you may need for your entire trip, along with a medical kit of basic supplies so that you can self-treat any minor ailments. You may be able to find a pharmacy in Conakry, but you should not rely on any form of treatment or facilities being available to you whilst in Guinea. Guinea was included in the countries affected by the outbreak of the Ebola virus. It has now been declared transmission free by the World Health Organisation.

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